TASMUN PRESS

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Read articles on the various TASMUN committees!

Q&A with Keynote Speaker Mr. Cooper

Written by Eason Y. (‘27)

     Mr. Cooper is a middle school history teacher, but also the keynote presenter for the MUN opening ceremony on April 17th. He did a presentation on the main focus of the 12th conference about reduced inequalities.

    He discusses his situation about the topic during his interview saying, “My mom likes to tell the story about how angry I used to get as a kid when they would say something like, “Hey, this is an adult conversation. Right? Adults are talking, you kids should go do something else. I would get so mad and say “why is it that I can't be here just because I'm a kid, that's not fair.”

    Additionally, he also can link up the idea of inequality with the issues that TASMUN and the UN have been able to recognize and saying that “I think we can look at inequality as this key element to the issues that we see in the world. So whether or not we're talking about [the] economy, or whether or not we're talking about [the]war between different groups of different countries, most of those things can come back to some ideas about inequality.”

    Cooper generally thinks that conflict is driven by the fear and current feeling that inequality is happening. As he mentions that if I were to get three candies and everyone gets one, would you state this as not fair because it’s in your favor? And if the same thing happens but in reverse you would call it out, though nobody will rally for you considering you merely stand against the things that don’t benefit you.

    With this statement out of the way, Mr. Cooper still desires to find comparisons to other forms of conflict within the world and recognize them. But he also generally strives to stop inequality from happening since the experience’s he’s felt as a child. But also perhaps the ones that maybe other people, groups (i.e LGBTQ+, the BLM movement), organizations, or even nations have felt. Mr. Cooper feels like most of the conflict in the world is due to prejudice, inequality, and other forms of discrimination.

A day in the life of a page, Page’s experience in the TASMUN conference

Written by Jaslene H. (‘27)

    Pages are a group of students who work behind the scenes, passing notes and handing paper out to the delegates during the debate. Another role pages need to take on is to hold delegates’ passes when they need to use the restroom and making sure everyone is on task.

    Charlize Tan, one of the pages, joined MUN as a page because she wanted to see what MUN is really about without putting too much commitment in it. She believes that this experience has taught her a lot about the conference and MUN in general.

    Charlize’s paging experience allows her to consider doing MUN next year. Charlize believes that being a page taught her a lot about MUN and gave her a lot of experience during the whole conference.

    Ashley Ho, another page, wanted to be a page because her brother was one of the chairs. She found the experience really rewarding as she learned a lot from listening to the debate.

    While observing debate, Ashley noted that when people were answering Points of Informations (POIs), questions delegates ask one another in front of everyone, the atmosphere was more intense; however, passing notes was a lot more calm in her committee. Most of the notes that she passed were on yielding for and against speeches.

    Ashley learned a lot from this experience and started to see things in different perspectives. “I honestly find it pretty fun because you get to pass notes and listen to speeches,” she said. “You also learn about the MUN format.”

    Because there are two to three pages in each room, it isn’t that overwhelming to pass a lot of notes because the work is more evenly split.

Good ECOSOC

Written by Isabella L.

     Before the debate started in the ECOSOC II, everyone works on lobbying. Lobbying is when you prepare for the resolutions to send to the chairs. During the lobbying, it was very peaceful; people were talking to each other in small groups; everybody was working very hard, and each group was on their computers on a shared Google Doc. Raffle tickets were promoted at this time too.

    During the first resolution for the ECOSOC, the delegates talked about the things like the UNSSC, who has access to social media, and cooperation in the south. For the second resolution, things like child labor, access to technology, jobs, education, ways of communicating without technology, improving developing countries like Venezuela, homeless people, world poverty, high paid jobs, and decreasing unemployment rates were discussed. Mostly everyone agreed with the second resolution, and no one disagreed.

    Lots of people submitted amendments. These amendments were to change the resolutions. The delegate representing Mali and Norway made many amendments. Everybody agreed that the same thing tends to happen very often. Issues that were talked about earlier were dropped as new things came up, which was interesting. For example, for resolution 2, education was talked about at first, and then poverty came up.

    It is very clear that all three chairs encouraged more delegates to speak up. This debate should be about the Economy and Social Council, but people mostly talked about the economy, not the social aspect of it. It is clear that economic impacts are easily proven to be beneficial. This debate was really in order, so things went by pretty quickly. This debate was mainly about weighing different impacts and benefits, which made many things straightforward.

Speak Up For Justice in the HRC

Written by Jacqueline C.

    During the afternoon of a long first day of TASMUN, at around 3:00, the debate finally begun after the whole morning for preparation to write and improve the delegate’s resolutions. When I walked into the Human Rights Council committee room, a representative of Germany was already presenting his resolution about the necessity of children’s education and how much learning impacts people’s lives. In his resolution, he has stated that since children need proper education, it is needed for them to have at least 6 years of learning.

    Afterward, the representative of the United Kingdom discussed his opposition to child abuse in his resolution, stating that due to high crime rates, inspection is necessary at places with high crime rates in order to prevent this issue. One country opposed the United Kingdom, stating that, “high crime rates may not be relevant to child abuse because not all crimes are related to it.” On the other hand, the representative of Iran also supported United Kingdom’s resolution about how places with high crime rates should have careful surveillance to protect children from abuse. However, one delegate inquired as to how governments can know where there are high crime/child abuse rates. But the United Kingdom delegate did not give up on his resolution and spoke out once more about how there is a way to know where high crime rates occur, but another country still yets opposed by saying there is a need to hire search warrants to propose this resolution.

    The HRC committee itself is a body that monitors the implementation of human rights (specifically the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights) on nations around the world. All State Members will have to submit regular reports on how they're implementing human rights, then the Committee will discuss its concerns and recommendations regarding the reports as learned in previous interviews I’ve had with upper school students. With that information learned, I know that child abuse, the negative impact on voluntarism and many other important issues in this world are currently being discussed in the Human Right Council.

    Despite the debate itself happening in the Human Rights Council committee, after staying in that room, observing what is happening and taking down important notes, I finally understand the clear process of how MUN works. Also, I can truly “know” what the environment is like in an actual TASMUN debate conference, with people staying focused on listening carefully at the representative’s resolution and either planning their opposition or not. If yes, the delegates will raise their country sign up high and ask questions related to their resolutions about unspecific, unclear information, or any other relevant questions. Or, they can oppose by presenting their own resolution to the rest of the committee, showing everyone else how your resolution is deserved to be passed and voted for. In the MUN debate, voting happens in order to decide whether the committee should pass a resolution or not; a page’s job is to count the number of votes, counting by sections. Not only that, but a page’s job is to deliver messages from one delegate to another as they are not supposed to talk to each other during the debate.

    Overall, I feel like the Human Rights Council is a very interesting committee to be in, covering a diversity of many important issues in this world regarding human rights, such as child abuse, the negative impact of voluntarism, etc. Being a part of the press team is a very pleasant experience, allowing me to be a part of the TASMUN conference before being a delegate.

Lit ICC

By Kenneth M

    During TASMUN 2019, the ICC (International Criminal Court) had a discussion about Mr. Al Mahdi and the discrimination in Mali. Al Mahdi is a high ranked person in a terrorist group that destroys historic monuments.Both sides stated a lot of evidence about discrimination and a lot of linking evidences that end up making them having a greater impact.

    All sorts of groups and races are discriminated, and weighing these types of evidence was very important in the discussion. To weigh evidence, they used numbers from one to five for their credibility, relevancy, and other elements that are essential to have good evidence. The committee discussion is really important because a lot of evidence is irrelevant if it was on its own, but it will seem a lot more relevant if the evidence is linked to another one. For example, one side said that if the militant attacks and the fire casualties linked, then he would give it a score of five. Mr. Al Mahdi is a person that is related with Al Qaeda and is destroying historic places. Discrimination is also one of the things Mr Al Mahdi is convicted of. This in fact was also one of the evidences that was weighed.

    Casualties and discrimination was a big topic during this discussion, and were commonly brought up throughout the debate.They said how the militant cause casualties, and discrimination against tribes and races.This evidence also had to be linked to create more relevance and credibility. One of the presidents was Douglass Lee. I noticed that the presidents were supposed to tell the other people what to do.

    The ICC had a lot of discussions that were really interesting. One of the highlights was a witness that actually attempted to contact the terrorist group.

The Going-Ons at UN Habitat

Written by Zoe C.

    Some people think that TASMUN is just a really serious place where you use hard words and debate to do complicated and boring things, but it’s not. Well, the part about hard words and debate and complicated things is, but it’s not boring. During lobbying, a very long time that allows the delegates to prepare some more, the atmosphere is quite lighthearted and casual despite the fact that everyone is dressed in suits and fancy clothes. Delegates work together in groups or individually.

    Some delegates were chatting with each other about normal topics that are irrelevant to TASMUN, like Pewdiepie, prices at night markets, what time their schools start and end, and which airlines they flew with to get to Taiwan. One delegate talked to their friends about how their “country is totally irrelevant.”

    One delegate, Eesha Madan from Singapore, was representing Lebanon. Her topic, improving urban planning. To prepare, she had a research document. After she had done some reading, she chose the topic that needs the most work in her country. Sounds like she was really prepared!

    The chairs of UN Habitat are quite helpful. They remind delegates how much time there is left and to remember to download their files, among other things. They also keep delegates on track. I think it might be a bit difficult to be a chair because they have to have a lot of confidence and have a commanding presence in the room. The chairs are also thoughtful because they announced that if you can’t see the words on the Power Point, they’ll make the font size bigger. Most people wouldn’t think of that, but these chairs did.

    First up to make a speech was the Czech Republic. She talked about how spreading awareness about poverty in that country and how a lot of people don’t have housing and education there since they can’t afford it. She seemed really passionate about this. The delegate of Vietnam, however, had a lot to say in response to this topic. He thought that raising awareness is vital and equally important as actually taking action and that the eradication of poverty is impossible. Also, when the Czech Republic delegate said that the action part isn’t mandatory, the delegate representing Vietnam replied no, “the action part doesn’t exist.” The debate went on for quite a long time.

    The debate was paused when the guest speaker arrived. Mr. Toby Openshaw, TAS’ official videographer, talked about indigenous people in Taiwan. Apparently, it is the year of indigenous languages in the UN. He said that in the past indigenous people have settled in a place, and then foreigners came and the indigenous people were pushed out or forced to convert to a different culture. For example, Japan made Taiwanese people learn Japanese and wear Japanese clothes. This destroys “the very fabric of their society.”

    The conference so far has been quite interesting and exciting, and I’m sure many people thought so as well.

What Happens in Status of Women Committee on the day of conference

Written by Katherine K.

    Some people think that TASMUN is just a really serious place where you use hard words and debate to do complicated and boring things, but it’s not. Well, the part about hard words and debate and complicated things is, but it’s not boring. During lobbying, a very long time that allows the delegates to prepare some more, the atmosphere is quite lighthearted and casual despite the fact that everyone is dressed in suits and fancy clothes. Delegates work together in groups or individually.

    Some delegates were chatting with each other about normal topics that are irrelevant to TASMUN, like Pewdiepie, prices at night markets, what time their schools start and end, and which airlines they flew with to get to Taiwan. One delegate talked to their friends about how their “country is totally irrelevant.”

    One delegate, Eesha Madan from Singapore, was representing Lebanon. Her topic, improving urban planning. To prepare, she had a research document. After she had done some reading, she chose the topic that needs the most work in her country. Sounds like she was really prepared!

    The chairs of UN Habitat are quite helpful. They remind delegates how much time there is left and to remember to download their files, among other things. They also keep delegates on track. I think it might be a bit difficult to be a chair because they have to have a lot of confidence and have a commanding presence in the room. The chairs are also thoughtful because they announced that if you can’t see the words on the Power Point, they’ll make the font size bigger. Most people wouldn’t think of that, but these chairs did.

    First up to make a speech was the Czech Republic. She talked about how spreading awareness about poverty in that country and how a lot of people don’t have housing and education there since they can’t afford it. She seemed really passionate about this. The delegate of Vietnam, however, had a lot to say in response to this topic. He thought that raising awareness is vital and equally important as actually taking action and that the eradication of poverty is impossible. Also, when the Czech Republic delegate said that the action part isn’t mandatory, the delegate representing Vietnam replied no, “the action part doesn’t exist.” The debate went on for quite a long time.

    The debate was paused when the guest speaker arrived. Mr. Toby Openshaw, TAS’ official videographer, talked about indigenous people in Taiwan. Apparently, it is the year of indigenous languages in the UN. He said that in the past indigenous people have settled in a place, and then foreigners came and the indigenous people were pushed out or forced to convert to a different culture. For example, Japan made Taiwanese people learn Japanese and wear Japanese clothes. This destroys “the very fabric of their society.”

    The conference so far has been quite interesting and exciting, and I’m sure many people thought so as well.

What Is Happening in the UN Environmental Programme Room

Written by Patricia M.

    Early on the first day of TASMUN 2019, I walked into the conference room with people talking about taxes on plastic and how humans are littering and wasting materials. Delegates were typing on their laptops, writing down their contentions and subpoints for the debate that was for later. There were people forming in groups, discussing plastic waste and how ocean animals are dying because of all of the trash that is thrown into the ocean by humans. When I looked around, the chairs were walking around the classroom, checking on some delegates. Each person had a tag/label in front of them which shows the country they are representing.

    The second time I went into the classroom, the debate had already started. Each person had one minute to speak at a time, and then other people started addressing that person’s arguments. There were two chairs/ heads at the front of the room, judging and teaching the delegates. One of them said that the debate would last 70 minutes, and he set a timer for every three minutes to remind the delegates that three minutes has passed. There were lots of conflicts and arguments during the first part of the debate, and the chair at the front of the room had to stop them when they went overtime. The debate was about plastic littering and how people are throwing waste into the ocean. Walking into the room really taught me lots of new things and I learned what a delegates meeting and debate look and feel like.